Diane Von Furstenberg Celebrates Female Oscar Nominees during Her Home

February 25, 2016 - Picnic Time

The Academy diversity debate competence have expel a shadow over this Sunday’s Oscars, nonetheless on Wednesday afternoon, engineer Diane von Furstenberg and Universal Pictures president Donna Langley highlighted a advances women have done in puncturing Hollywood’s male-dominated hierarchy by celebrating a year’s womanlike Oscar nominees. As Langley pronounced during her welcome, it is usually as vicious to speak about a swell Hollywood is creation in a farrago conversations.

Guests during a event, that was hosted during von Furstenberg’s halcyon home in Coldwater Canyon, enclosed prior Oscar winners like Ellen Burstyn, Patricia Arquette, and Marisa Tomei; this year’s behaving nominees like Jennifer Jason Leigh; and a smattering of likewise considerable women who had flown in from around a creation to give their masculine peers foe in categories open to both genders, like Mad Max’s Lisa Thompson, from Australia, who is nominated for prolongation design, and Ex Machina’s Sara Bennett, from England, who is nominated for visible effects.

After a poetic lunch, eaten picnic-style on von Furstenberg’s front lawn, a horde called her guest into her expanded vital room to commend any of a year’s womanlike Oscar nominees, including Andrea Berloff (best bizarre screenplay, Straight Outta Compton), Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey (film editing, Star Wars), Liz Garbus (best documentary feature, What Happened, Miss Simone?), Kristie Macosko Krieger (best picture, Bridge of Spies), and Mary Parent (best picture, The Revenant).

By a designer’s calculations, there are 11 some-more womanlike nominees this year than there were final year, nonetheless a horde told her guest that a numbers still aren’t satisfactory. “Clearly we have a lot of work to do in removing some-more women’s stories on-screen and some-more women directors and screenwriters and set designers. The initial thing that we can do to commission some-more women, though, is to trust in ourselves and make it happen.”

Diane von Furstenberg speaks during a third annual DVF Oscar luncheon.

As an instance of how inbred gender disposition is in a culture, von Furstenberg common one of her possess new mistake pas, done in annoy of a fact that she is a lifelong feminist.

“It’s unequivocally bizarre how, even if we are a feminist, we can be prejudiced. A few weeks ago we was told we had to have a tiny surgery, and my alloy introduced me to this surgeon, and it was a woman. And a initial thing we pronounced was, ‘Oh, it’s a woman?’ we couldn’t trust that we indeed pronounced that! we was so ashamed, nonetheless now I’m regulating it a lot as an instance for others.”

She continued, “All we have to do is be improved women so that there are some-more stories about women, some-more stories created by women.” Von Furstenberg also gave her co-host an assignment: motioning to Langley, who was obliged for Universal Pictures’ $6.7 billion box-office year in 2015, von Furstenberg added, “And, Donna, make certain that your unequivocally large studio gives some-more women immature lights.”

Throughout von Furstenberg’s speech, a engineer was interrupted intermittently by yelps from her Jack Russell terrier, Dina. Explaining her dog’s unrestrained for certain remarks, von Furstenberg deadpanned, “She’s a female, too.”

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BEST PICTURE

BEST PICTURE

The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight


First thing’s first: cranky off all a titles that weren’t also nominated for best executive and best editor. That leaves 4 films with an tangible possibility to win: The Big Short, Spotlight, Mad Max, and The Revenant. Two of those are deceptively indignant emanate films with medium budgets and garb casts, dual are action-packed spectaculars featuring large stars, large vistas, and large box-office returns. What does Hollywood’s investiture wish 2016 to be remembered for: hard-hitting exposés or big-canvas moviemaking? Normally, a supposed predecessor awards would give us a hint, nonetheless this year’s formula have been all over a dang place. Spotlight won Screen Actors Guild garb honors, along with a raise of critics’ awards; Mad Max chased down many of a other critics’ prizes; The Big Short notched a unequivocally predictive Producers Guild of America award; and The Revenant snared a Golden Globe, a BAFTA, and a Directors Guild award. After a BAFTAs, many of a intelligent (cynical?) income changed into The Revenant’s column, nonetheless this one’s as tighten as it gets.


Who should win: Oh, we don’t know! Spotlight, maybe? The Revenant? The Big Short? Mad Max: Fury Road? Maybe we all win given there were that many good cinema this year?
Who will win: The Revenant? Probably? It’s unequivocally tough to tell, guys. — Mike Hogan

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

BEST DIRECTOR

BEST DIRECTOR

Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight
Adam McKay, The Big Short
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Lenny Abrahamson, Room


When Ridley Scott unsuccessful to measure a assignment for The Martian it threw this difficulty a bit to a winds, and there’s still copiousness of room for surprise, with a 3 best-picture favorites—The Revenant, The Big Short, and Spotlight—all represented and favorite Mad Max: Fury Road still roving on copiousness of nauseating steam. But when final year’s leader Iñárritu won a D.G.A. and BAFTA prizes, it seemed to transparent a trail to make him a initial back-to-back best-director leader given Joseph L. Mankiewicz in 1950 and 1951.


Who should win: George Miller. The technical fulfilment and animation of Mad Max ought to be a indication for any executive of any age.
Who will win: Alejandro González Iñárritu. Hard to disagree with history—and a win for a Mexican-born executive could lessen a bit of that #OscarsSoWhite guilt. — Katey Rich

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

BEST ACTOR

BEST ACTOR

Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl
Matt Damon, The Martian
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Bryan Cranston, Trumbo


Last year’s winner. A five-time hopeful opposed for his initial victory. A vital film star whose final leading-actor assignment was scarcely 20 years ago. A vicious heavenly enjoying his initial assignment as a lead. And a much-lauded TV star rebellious his initial loyal starring film role. All are opposed for this prize, nonetheless a account is mostly focused on that five-time nominee, perpetual also-ran Leonardo DiCaprio. He’s won a 3 vital awards heading adult to a Oscar—the Golden Globe, a SAG, and a BAFTA—so he has a lot of movement going into Sunday’s ceremony.


Who should win: As formidable as DiCaprio’s liver-eating, frigid-water-braving opening was on a technical merits, Michael Fassbender is so discerning and enthralling in doing Steve Jobs’s happy book that we’d give a endowment to him. Sorry, Leo.
Who will win: Not that sorry, though, because, it doesn’t unequivocally matter. Leonardo DiCaprio is finally going to win an Oscar this year. — Richard Lawson

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

BEST ACTRESS

BEST ACTRESS

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn


Yes, Cate Blanchett is typically brilliant—if chilly—in Carol, and yes, they should (and substantially will) bottom behaving courses on Charlotte Rampling’s tranquil pointing in 45 Years. And yeah, J.Law got that Golden Globe for Joy. But if anyone other than Brie Larson wins this award, it will be a major-league upset. And righteously so! She’s a explanation in Room, both during a claustrophobic initial half, where she’s sealed in a strew for years on finish with her insanely darling son (played by newly minted red-carpet mascot Jacob Tremblay), and during a bittersweet behind half, where (spoiler alert) she learns that loyal recovering usually begins with earthy escape. If there’s a speed strike on a Brie Larson Oscar Expressway, it’s Saoirse Ronan, whose sweet, winning opening in a Irish-immigrant play Brooklyn warmed awards-screener households opposite a land this holiday season.


Who should win: Brie Larson, nonetheless seriously, see Brooklyn
Who will win: Brie Larson. —M.H.

Courtesy of A24.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Christian Bale, The Big Short
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Sylvester Stallone, Creed


After a fascinating pre-nominations derby of learned actors in scene-stealing roles competing in a wide-open category, it all became so elementary a night of a Golden Globes, when Sylvester Stallone viewed a station acclaim as he rose to accept his award, and a hearts of Hollywood seemed entirely pinned to their sleeves. None of his foe seemed to have a heart to put adult a quarrel opposite a Italian Stallion and who can censure them? Creed, rigourously close out of a rest of a Oscar derby, deserves a impulse here as many as Stallone does.


Who should win: Call us crazy, nonetheless Tom Hardy’s mumbling, ominous knave spin in The Revenant is nonetheless another evidence for since he’s one of a biggest shade actors to emerge in new years.
Who will win: Stallone (and law be told, he deserves it, too). —K.R.

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs
Rooney Mara, Carol
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight


This is one of a trickiest categories to call right now, as there are dual equally constrained competing narratives. One is that Alicia Vikander, who was in flattering many any film done in 2015, will be rewarded for her breakthrough year in a form of a win for her clever opening (which was unequivocally a lead) in The Danish Girl. The other is that Kate Winslet, who has already won a Golden Globe and a BAFTA this awards season, will collect adult her second trophy. But, Vikander was not nominated in ancillary singer during a Globes or a BAFTAs, so Winslet has usually left adult opposite Vikander once, during a SAGs, and lost. Oscar night will usually be their second showdown.


Who should win: Forget both of those plotlines and give a esteem to Rooney Mara, who is a pensive, soulful core of a overwhelming Carol.
Who will win: Given all a movement for Leo and everyone’s adore of saying him and Kate together, we’re gonna go forward and speculation that Kate Winslet will be a (slight) dissapoint leader here. — R.L.

Courtesy of Universal Studios/François Duhamel.

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, Spotlight
Matt Charman, Joel Coen, and Ethan Coen, Bridge of Spies
Jonathan Herman, Andrea Berloff, S. Leigh Savidge, and Alan Wenkus, Straight Outta Compton
Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, and Josh Cooley, Inside Out
Alex Garland, Ex Machina


This difficulty rocks given it recognizes dual glorious films that should’ve gotten many some-more love: Ex Machina, Alex Garland’s sci-fi nonplus box starring Domhall Gleason, Oscar Isaac, and Alicia Vikander as an artificial-intelligence femme fatale; and Straight Outta Compton, a gangsta-rap start story that had a energy to cocktail a tip in a #OscarsSoWhite narrative, had a A.M.P.A.S. voting physique usually answered a pager call. Instead, a latter’s all-white essay group scored a film’s usually nomination. Oops! Anyway, conjunction of those cinema is going to win here, and conjunction is Bridge of Spies, notwithstanding a elevating participation of Joel and Ethan Coen. This one’s going to Spotlight’s Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, who have won any predecessor we can consider of, and it competence good be a usually statuette a onetime “Oscar front-runner” will take home all night.


Who should win: Spotlight
Who will win: Spotlight —M.H.

Courtesy of Open Road Films.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Drew Goddard, The Martian
Nick Hornby, Brooklyn
Adam McKay and Charles Randolph, The Big Short
Phyllis Nagy, Carol
Emma Donoghue, Room


A difficulty that promises “unoriginality” right in a pretension is congested with great, uninformed choices this year, from Emma Donoghue’s sublime navigation of her possess novel to Drew Goddard’s enterprising welcome of math nerdery to Phyllis Nagy‘s personal 18-year tour to move Carol to a screen. But as a three-way best-picture competition has clambered along and maybe staid in preference of The Revenant, this has started to demeanour like a one slam-dunk place to prerogative The Big Short, that derives many of a success from McKay and Randolph’s courteous instrumentation of Michael Lewis’s book. Like Spotlight in a other screenplay category, this could breeze adult being a usually win for what’s still a legitimate best-picture contender.


Who should win: With all a concentration on Matt Damon, The Martian is ignored for being a large garb piece, and Goddard carves out so many characters and story lines in a book that still feels swift and funny.
Who will win: The Big Short, that will make “Oscar-winning Step Brothers executive Adam McKay” a smashing reality. — K.R.

Courtesy of Paramount Pictures.

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Emmanuel Lubezki, The Revenant
Edward Lachman, Carol
Roger Deakins, Sicario
John Seale, Mad Max: Fury Road
Robert Richardson, The Hateful Eight


While praises have been sung for any of these nominees, for good reason, we can substantially speculation that The Hateful Eight and, sadly, Carol aren’t unequivocally contenders here. With a remaining three, it comes down to either The Revenant is as clever a claimant as it’s looking, either a Academy wants to finally give Roger Deakins his prolonged overdue Oscar, or either Mad Max is unfailing to go home with all a technical awards. (Which it could!)


Who should win: Give a damn thing to Deakins already. His career has been remarkable, and he towering Sicario from pale thriller to work of art.
Who will win: Lubezki will mangle annals and win his third Oscar in 3 years (he won final year for Birdman and a year before for Gravity) for The Revenant. — R.L.

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox.

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Sandy Powell, Carol
Sandy Powell, Cinderella
Jacqueline West, The Revenant
Paco Delgado, The Danish Girl
Jenny Beavan, Mad Max: Fury Road


Notice anything about those initial dual nominees? They’re a same person! That’s 12-time hopeful and three-time leader Sandy Powell, ladies and gentlemen, and given her line record she certain looks like a chairman to kick in this category. That is, unless she splits a vote, withdrawal an open line for The Revenant’s Jacqueline West or, as many online pundits would have it, Mad Max: Fury Road’s Jenny Beavan. The usually problem with that speculation is that Powell has been double-nominated before and won, for 1998’s Shakespeare in Love. Since Cinderella racked adult $200 million during a box bureau and wasn’t nominated anywhere else, we have a feeling a Academy will take this event to clear a revisit to a ball.


What should win: Carol
What will win: Cinderella

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
Bridge of Spies
The Martian
The Revenant


Mad Max is staid to brush many of a technical categories, and this one is no exception—who can pattern a discriminating duration patience of The Danish Girl or Bridge of Spies, or a furious and wooly outdoor of The Revenant and The Martian (what, we give God an Oscar?), to compare a resourceful disharmony of a Fury Road? It wins for a pattern of Furiosa’s supply alone.


What should win: Mad Max’s prolongation pattern is awaited in Valhalla.
What will win: And on Oscar night, it will get there. — K.R.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST MAKEUP amp; HAIRSTYLING

BEST MAKEUP HAIRSTYLING

The Revenant
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared
Mad Max: Fury Road


If anyone in America has seen The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared, we haven’t met them, nonetheless during slightest a makeup bend of a Academy appreciated a unnatural aging in a history-spanning film. Still, this competition is substantially between a other dual nominated movies.


What should win: What a hell, give a thing to The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared. It’d mostly be fun to hear a presenter(s) contend a title.
What will win: This is one of a several technical categories that Mad Max seems expected to win. — R.L.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens


This is one of many technical categories that Mad Max: Fury Road, formed on what we’ve seen so distant during awards season, is roughly guaranteed to win. And really, can we disagree with that? All that continue and H2O and fume and dried and driving. And that associate with a guitar. It’s something, we tell you. But give a other contenders their due: these were some fine-looking pictures! One of them managed to demeanour like a bizarre Star Wars and a ideally benefaction 2016 space adventure. Others deposited Matt Damon on Mars and Leo DiCaprio on a aged American frontier, convincingly. And a final incited Alicia Vikander into a voluptuous robot. Good year all around for visible effects!


What should win: Mad Max: Fury Road, we guess
What will win: Mad Max: Fury Road, for sure. — M.H.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST FILM EDITING

BEST FILM EDITING

The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens


The Big Short picked adult a few critics’ prizes for this early on, suggesting that a whiz-bang speed of a film was wowing people some-more than anything. But a accord has finally staid on an even some-more dazzling, and deserving, contender in Mad Max: Fury Road. As a usually solo womanlike contender in a difficulty (Star Wars group Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey are also nominated), and executive George Miller’s wife, Margaret Sixel is a singular hopeful in a technical difficulty with a truly constrained account that appeals to electorate though any believe of modifying whatsoever. Plus, that dirt charge scene? One for a ages.


Who should win: As invisible as a journal editor’s work and usually as invaluable, Tom McArdle’s clever cobbling together of Spotlight deserves some-more attention.
Who will win: But who’s going to repudiate a force behind one of a best movement cinema of new years? Not a Academy. — K.R.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Ennio Morricone, The Hateful Eight
Carter Burwell, Carol
John Williams, Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Thomas Newman, Bridge of Spies
Jóhann Jóhannsson, Sicario


A clever preference of nominees, from first-timers to generation-defining veterans. Jóhannsson gave Scario copiousness of new-school bwaaamp and portent, while Williams revisited his many iconic measure (in an oeuvre astoundingly stocked with iconic scores) and combined to a mutation and fad of The Force Awakens. As Williams was bustling doing that, Thomas Newman filled in with Steven Spielberg, lending a unhappy lilt to Bridge of Spies. Carter Burwell gave Carol low pain and a shake of hope, while Morricone lent The Hateful Eight a sovereignty it competence not differently have had.


Who should win: Carter Burwell has stoical some of a loveliest, many evocative film scores of a final 30 years. But he’d never even been nominated for an Oscar before Carol. He’s due.
Who will win: Yeah, but, Ennio Morricone is a fable in his 80s, and his Hateful Eight measure was great, so he’ll win. — R.L.

Courtesy of The Weinstein Company.

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction
“Til It Happens to You,” The Hunting Ground
“Simple Song #3,” Youth
“Writing’s On a Wall,” Spectre


I take song unequivocally seriously, and to me a apparent choice for Best Original Song in a Motion Picture is a one that has wowed critics, seduced Grammy voters, and strike a Top 10 not usually here in a States nonetheless in Canada, a U.K., Ireland, and 7 other countries besides. Interestingly, that song—The Weeknd’s “Earned It,” from Fifty Shades of Grey—probably won’t win a Academy Award. Why not? Because “Til It Happens to You,” that never done it onto a Billboard Top 100, has 3 essential advantages among voters: it’s co-written by eight-time Oscar hopeful Diane Warren; it’s sung by Lady Gaga, whose manuscript with Tony Bennett unprotected her to a whole new generation; and Gaga herself is uninformed off a Golden Globe win, so she feels like a winner. That’s showbiz!


What should win: “Earned It”
What will win: “Til It Happens to You” — M.H.

BEST SOUND MIXING

BEST SOUND MIXING

Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens


Sound mixing: it’s not unequivocally what we hear (that’s a sound modifying guys, below) nonetheless how we hear them, from choices about that outcome to make a loudest to moments of overpower that can be usually as dramatic.


What should win: Vroom vroom. Mad Max: Fury Road!
What will win: In a technical difficulty brush that many are predicting, a War Boys should have no difficulty holding this one. — K.R.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST SOUND EDITING

BEST SOUND EDITING

Mad Max: Fury Road
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
The Martian
Sicario
The Revenant


Sound modifying is fundamentally sound effects, all those bone crunches and engine roars and bullet pings and whatnot.


What should win: What had some-more of all that in 2015 than Mad Max: Fury Road?
What will win: The Academy knows that, too. Mad Max: Fury Road ought to win here. — R.L.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Studios.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

Inside Out
Anomalisa
Shaun a Sheep Movie
Boy and a World
When Marnie Was There


This is a two-picture competition between Inside Out, a shining and resourceful family-friendly underline from Pixar (Toy Story, Wall-E), and Anomalisa, a shining and resourceful family-unfriendly underline from Charlie Kaufman (Being John Malkovich, Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind). Anybody wish to gamble on Kaufman in this matchup? Yeah, me neither. But a misanthrope can dream, can’t he?


What should win: If I ruled a world, Anomalisa. Although, truly, Inside Out is Pixar during a best.
What will win: Inside Out. Bet on it. — M.H.

Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

BEST DOCUMENTARY

BEST DOCUMENTARY

Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom


Yes, a classify is true; many of these documentaries are depressing, from looks during song careers raid by hardship (Amy, What Happened, Miss Simone?) to stories of unimaginable assault in times of polite fight (Cartel Land, The Look of Silence) to an on-the-ground demeanour during Ukraine’s protests that led to a bureaucratic change . . . for now. But there’s a lot of accumulation and implausible filmmaking here as well, and a dual viewed front-runners—Amy and The Look of Silence—could not be some-more opposite in style; Amy executive Asif Kapadia compiles reams of archival footage to tell a comfortless story of Amy Winehouse, while in The Look of Silence Joshua Oppenheimer continues a story he began in The Act of Killing to benefaction interviews with survivors, and perpetrators, of a Indonesian genocide. How can someone presumably select between a two? Beats us.


Who should win: The Act of Killing mislaid to a feel-good 20 Feet from Stardom. A win here would be a honourable possibility to make adult for it.
Who will win: But Amy, distant some-more worldly than many docs about famous people, seems unfailing for a honourable win instead. — K.R.

Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival.

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Son of Saul
Mustang
A War
Embrace of a Serpent
Theeb


Mustang was rapturously received, while A War tells an obligatory story about contemporary armed conflict. Theeb is a unconditional duration play about a far-flung place, and Embrace of a Serpent has a catchy cred. Son of Saul is a harrowing Holocaust drama. Which could, and mostly does, trump all. But Mustang does seem to be creation a late mangle for it . . .


Who should win: Bursting with life and beautifully rendered, we’d adore to see a lenient Mustang take home a trophy.
Who will win: Exquisitely done and heartless to watch, Son of Saul is a regressive choice here. But it’s so tough to watch that we’re going to call this as a Mustang upset. — R.L.

Courtesy of Cohen Media Group.

BEST ANIMATED SHORT

BEST ANIMATED SHORT

Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live Without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow


Rolling Stone’s David Ehrlich has made a large fuss about a low-fi nonetheless longish World of Tomorrow, that he found existentially irresistible. Me? Not so much. Plus, he went all-in for Carol and demeanour how that incited out. Sanjay’s Super Team is a estimable Pixar side project, since Prologue is some-more like a college art project, nonetheless pointer me adult for a resourceful animation of Bear Story, a speechless retelling of an civic bear’s family saga, and a wily storytelling of We Can’t Live Without Cosmos, that charts a amatory attribute of dual masculine Russian cosmonauts.


What should win: Bear Story
What will win: World of Tomorrow — M.H.

Courtesy of Don Hertzfeldt.

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT

Ave Maria
Day One
Everything Will Be Okay
Shok
Stutterer


Two of these films, a desirable Israeli culture-clash story Ave Maria and a small English intrigue Stutterer, won’t actively hurt your day—and Ave Maria’s addressing of vital domestic issues in a desirable emanate could give it an corner here. But there’s distant some-more energy in Shok, a story about boys in Kosovo held adult in that country’s fight and mortal racial cleansing, and generally Everything Will Be Okay, that starts as a story about a divorced father spending a day with his daughter and slowly, methodically devolves into something distant some-more heartbreaking.


What should win: Everything Will Be Okay, on a energy of immature singer Julia Pointner’s inhuman opening alone.
What will win: Shok has a gut-punch cause that will expected put it over a top. — K.R.

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

Body Team 12
Chau, Beyond a Lines
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of a Shoah
A Girl in a River
Last Day of Freedom


Dealing with Ebola, birth defects, a Holocaust, a genocide penalty, and respect killings, all of these shorts are flattering heavy. But, something’s gotta win!


What should win: Body Team 12, about some beyond-brave people who worked as physique disposers during Libera’s Ebola outbreak, tells a fascinating story.
What will win: We’d speculation Body Team 12 will hold a Academy and emerge victorious. — R.L.

Courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival.

source ⦿ http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2016/02/oscar-luncheon-female-nominees

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