New Picnic Time / The Art of Walking / The Song of a Bailing Man

January 10, 2017 - Picnic Time

cover art

New Picnic Time

(Fire)
US: 9 Dec 2016

Amazon iTunes cover art

The Art of Walking

(Fire)
US: 9 Dec 2016

Amazon iTunes cover art

The Song of a Bailing Man

(Fire)
US: 9 Dec 2016

Amazon iTunes

Pere Ubu is an problematic rope with a collateral ‘O’; a cold rope with a collateral ‘C’; and a rope we learn after years of digging around and digesting all a classics of a stone genre. Simply put, they are art-punk and not well-known, nonetheless these dual signifiers mix to emanate a ultimate name-drop—“But have we listened Pere Ubu’s The Modern Dance?” Their strain lives in a same rarified atmosphere of other little-known cult groups like a Residents, X-Ray Spex, and Television Personalities. Their story is simple, too: they hailed from a inlet of Cleveland in a ‘70s. A internal organisation called Rocket From a Tombs separate adult and became dual opposite groups: a Dead Boys and Pere Ubu. The former is hands down punk, while a latter named itself after an absurd play and done artsy punk/noise. In an try to strech new audiences, Fire Records recently reissued a band’s third, fourth, and fifth annals (New Picnic Time, The Art of Walking, and The Song of a Bailing Man, respectively).

Their initial record, 1978’s The Modern Dance, was an untamable fire. It total punk and fashionable in a time when punk was still deliberate fashionable on a own. From a opening track, “Non-Alignment Pact”, onward, though, a crux is clear: formidable punk with a sound problem led by an formidable vocalist usually as expected to screech as he is to sing. Their second record, Dub Housing, is arguably better, yet is mostly a feat path that revisits a same domain as a initial record. It’s a one-two punch that’s value a time of a connoisseur. 

In contrast, a subsequent 3 records, New Picnic Time, The Art of Walking, and Song of a Bailing Man, uncover a remarkable change in a instruction of a band. Although Dave Thomas opens a initial of a garland by saying, “It’s me again! Hey! Hey! It’s me again!”, it doesn’t take prolonged to notice that a instruction of a rope has been altered or mislaid in a haze. For a infancy of a rest of record, a driving stroke of a strain seems left and transposed by an continuous need to sound “weird” or “strange”, and, unfortunately, out of tune.  For example, “A Small Dark Cloud” offers zero outward of a synth mimicking bird chirps for scarcely dual minutes. Once they have finished with that gimmick, all they offer is a singular steady drum synth note as David Thomas pants, wails, and screams, “Don’t stone a boat” like his life depends on it. Unfortunately, they move behind a bird chirps for good magnitude occasionally, that wouldn’t be so bad if a strain weren’t scarcely 6 mins in length. This avant-nonsense continues for a rest of a record, with a usually tiny postpone being offering by a shutting track, “Kingdom Come”, that has a bit of a tune.

The Art of Walking, a band’s fourth LP, shows small change from a instruction of New Picnic Time . In fact, it seems like their “experiments” were authorised to decoction even longer. Whereas New Picnic Time sounded as if a organisation tangled for a few hours before carrying David Thomas drivel drunkenly over a recordings, The Art of Walking seems a small some-more designed, a small some-more planned. The second track, “Rhapsody in Pink”, offers small outward of Dave Thomas’ epitome warblings and out-of-tune-with-each-other instrument noodlings, yet it flexes many some-more restraint than many of a former record could muster. Even yet The Art of Walking suffers from a same over-noodling as New Picnic Time, it during slightest sounds like a rope was in a same room together most of a time, and that’s an improvement. 

The Song of a Bailing Man is simply a many beguiling of a three, and a reason is simple: it’s fun. Whereas a final dual annals were awash with straight-faced weirdness, The Song of a Bailing Man seems to be winking during a audience, acknowledging that strain this uncanny deserves some smiles. The opening track, “The Long Walk Home”, starts as a weird tour yet offers some flightiness by adding a overpass that sounds like jazz achieved by over-exuberant ten-year-olds perplexing to stir their family. It’s fun. Later, “Use of a Dog” offers symphonic sax lines that hilariously mix in with Dave Thomas’ squeaking and squawking vocals, and “West Side Story” closes with definitely jubilant guitar explosion. Elsewhere on a record, a antics continue to impress.

These 3 annals heralded an finish of an epoch for Pere Ubu. After Song of The Bailing Man, Pere Ubu went on interregnum for 5 years, and a subsequent 4 annals (starting with 1988’s The Tenement Year) saw an even bigger change for a band:  mutation into an initial cocktail group. As bizarre of a tour as New Picnic Time, The Art of Walking, and The Song of a Bailing Man offered, Pere Ubu was going even weirder places. It’s anachronistic to say, yet stay tuned. You shall be entertained.

New Picnic Time

Rating:

The Art of Walking

Rating:

The Song of a Bailing Man

Rating:

More picnic ...

› tags: Picnic Time /