Sophia Coxe cruise brings behind aged times – News – Standard Speaker

July 12, 2015 - Picnic Time

Visitors followed fiddle tunes to a cruise behind a Historic Sophia Coxe House in Drifton on Saturday.

“It’s called ‘Over a Waterfall,’” Paul Riffon pronounced after plucking a final note and putting down his bow.

For a picnic, Riffon of Barnesville played old-fashioned song like people would have sung and danced to on their porches and in their parlors when a residence was built in 1869.

Sophia and Eckley B. Coxe, a spark baron, lived in a residence then, though after her genocide in 1926 Sophia Coxe asked that a residence be used for education, one of a causes that her family upheld by assisting start MMI Preparatory School.

Over a years, a home been a remit core for nurses, widows and other women.

This year, a Sophia Coxe Memorial Foundation and Education Center shaped to extend a educational reach.

The substructure non-stop a home for weekend tours and hold programs such as an afternoon with labor organizer Mother Jones.

The cruise on Saturday gave visitors a possibility to see a 13 acres around a home, where a net was set adult for badminton, tables for lunch and wickets for croquet.

Blacksmith Bryan Dunnigan demonstrated his qualification but lighting a fire.

He placed a steel frame in a vice, struck it with a hammer, repositioned a frame in a vice, swung a produce a few some-more times and hold adult a result.

“To put a lope in a square ofmetal, there it is. It’s that simple,” pronounced Dunnigan, who teaches one-day courses in blacksmithing during a Coxe House with his son, Keenan.

Albert Stefanik forsaken spoonfuls of mud from a miner’s vessel into a little sluice. With tweezers, he picked out little pieces that lodged on a bottom and glinted in a sun.

Gold.

Stefanick, who took adult prospecting as a hobby 20 years ago, doesn’t find most of a yellow steel nearby his home in Hazleton. The mud he stretched for Saturday’s proof came from Georgia.

Hazleton’s belligerent is improved famous for agreeable tough spark called anthracite, and Stefanick applauded a substructure for revelation a story of a heading family from a mining era.

“How most of story is left in Hazleton and Freeland? I’m blissful to see they’re gripping story alive,” Stefanick said.

Sophia Coxe remained dedicated to a spark segment even after her father died in 1895.

Her relatives, including Charles Coxe who lived opposite a street, changed behind to Philadelphia, where she could association with a city’s aristocrats.

“She was high society. She spoke 4 languages. She could give a reading of Macbeth that would make we cry,” Karen Esak, a substructure member, said.

Instead, Sophia Coxe stayed in a residence in Drifton.

kjackson@standardspeaker.com

source ⦿ http://standardspeaker.com/news/sophia-coxe-picnic-brings-back-old-times-1.1911203

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