Walking in a moonlight: Twin Cities parks offer programs

February 24, 2015 - Picnic Time



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    Brett Sieberer, an interpretive naturalist during a Lowry Nature Center in Victoria, prefers a park when it’s enshrouded in snow, during slightest when he’s heading a full-moon walk.

    “If it’s a intelligible night, a whole place lights up,” and shadows widespread opposite a landscape, he said.

    Several sites in a Three Rivers Park District are charity full-moon walks on Mar 5. The monthly walks, that have themes associated to a seasons, stress all from snowshoeing to maple syrup in a wintertime.

    The procedure dates to a 1980s. A children’s book patrician “Walk When a Moon Is Full,” by naturalist Frances Hamerstrom, supposing some inspiration, according to Lee Ann Landstrom, outside preparation administrator during Eastman Nature Center in Dayton.

    Just as in a book, a thought is to learn a “neat things function during night,” Landstrom said.

    During a guided walks, people’s eyes adjust to a dark. The naturalists don’t use flashlights, as “there’s adequate ambient light,” she said.

    The mile-long transport is leisurely, though it’s also educational. “We speak a small bit about special astronomical events,” she said. “Then we speak about phenomenology, happenings in nature, birds migrating, frogs, flowers in bloom,” depending on a time of year.

    Eastman is located in a sugarine maple-basswood forest. A naturalist will go over a routine of collecting corrupt and hot it down into syrup, Landstrom said. Ice cream sundaes surfaced with homemade maple syrup that’s constructed on site will be served.

    Similarly, during a Lowry Nature Center, “we speak about a trees, what needs to occur weather-wise for this to work” and maple syrup tapping’s origins with Native Americans, pronounced Sieberer.

    Sieberer takes people by a forested area, around a distant west finish of Crosby Lake and an open prairie. In a winter, groups wander opposite a solidified lake.

    A cluster of cruise tables that can be found in a center of a level creates for a good respite. “After going by a forest, a level seems vastly different. It’s far-reaching open with an extraordinary perspective of a moon — a giant, glossy orb,” Sieberer said.

    Here, he leads people to “sit and listen for 30 seconds.” One competence hear a call of a barred owl or a coyote or even a ice sepulchral on Crosby Lake.

    Of a owls, Sieberer said, “We’re removing into a time when they’re pairing up, sitting in their nests.” Sometimes a organisation gets to hear dual owls job behind and forth. “You mostly only hear silence, that is cool, too,” he said.

    In a dark, senses other than steer flog in with fuller force. To denote that point, Sieberer has people theory a essence of bottles filled with spices, cocoa and coffee.

    Another approach to take in a elements is by snowshoe. At Cleary Lake Regional Park in Prior Lake, participants start on a neat trail, according to Josh Sweet, procedure and trickery dilettante during a park.

    Snowshoeing was a ancestral mode of transport in Minnesota and around a world. It’s fun to step behind in time that way, he said.

    Sweet scouts out a route conditions forward of time to figure out where a sleet is deepest. That’s indispensable for snowshoeing. The thought is to be means to transport off-trail, ascending and down and by a trees. “It gives people a feel for what it’s like to snowshoe.”

    It’s a bit of a workout. “If we widespread your weight out more, we can stay on tip of a sleet more,” Sweet said.


    • related content

    • A past guided moonlit transport took place during Crow-Hassan Park Reserve, a Three Rivers park nearby Rogers. By night, hikers see things they wouldn’t by day, naturalists say.

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